Fall, hiking, History

Hike — Willamette Mission State Park

On Saturday we went out to Willamette Mission State Park for a short hike. The ladies at church have asked me to lead a hike in October, and I wanted to recce and see where the picnic areas and bathrooms are on the trail I want to walk, and pick a good spot for everyone to meet. We parked at the first parking lot and walked about a mile and a half to the Filbert Grove day use area, where we started what was supposed to be a 4.2 mile loop. The park is fairly flat, no hills to worry about. I wanted something that pretty much anyone could do since I’m not sure of the fitness level of the ladies who might want to join us. I also wanted to find a good place to have a snack or lunch with the ladies.

Willamette Mission Park also has a lot of history, so I hope to be able to present some history of the park to the ladies as well. This year Oregon is celebrating 100 years of its State Parks system.

Jason Lee and the Willamette Mission
100 years of Oregon’s State Parks system.

Near the parking lot we passed some blackberry bushes and Linda had to give some a try.

Someone stuck a feather in this post.

The sky was very hazy due to some fires happening around the area. We didn’t smell smoke though, and didn’t have any trouble breathing. It was supposed to be sunny and 95 degrees, but I think the haze kept things a little cooler. The sun didn’t come out much at all.

Hazy sky
The sun looked like this (zoomed in)

On our way to the Filbert Grove, we stopped to use the bathroom and saw some horses. The riders were standing on a picnic table to get up onto the horses! There are many equestrian trails at the park.

Once we got to the Filbert Grove area, we took a path that led to the 4.2-mile Willamette Mission Loop, found on the AllTrails app. The loop is on mostly paved paths with a smaller part on dirt trails. On our walk we detoured a bit to go to the Wheatland Ferry dock to watch the ferry for a minute. A man went down to the water to fish for wide-mouth bass.

Wheatland Ferry
Someone left these headphones on the little bridge (?)
The man caught a bass and was getting out his phone to take a photo. He let the fish go after he got a picture of it.

Here is some more of the history of the park. The Willamette Station of the Methodist Mission was started across the lake there in 1834. Some “ghost buildings” have been placed to represent the first mission buildings that were built on that site.

If you zoom in on this photo you can read the history of the Mission.
Mission “ghost buildings”.

On the walk you can see the nation’s largest black cottonwood tree across the lake.

Nation’s Largest Black Cottonwood
Cottonwood sign. You can see the tree in the background.

Marnie is very good about picking up trash along the way. She found more than one cigarette butt. Really, smokers? I mean, come ON.

Marnie does trail maintence.

Dirt trail.

Paved path.

There were still a few flowers and berries left here and there.

Mystery berries. We didn’t eat any.

Teasel

Pine tree.

Rose hips.

Osprey nest.

They have their own sign.

There were no ospreys in the nest that we could see, which was too bad. I guess it isn’t time for osprey babies. We saw many birds and squirrels during the day and a couple of deer that were too far away to get a photo of them, and one of these orange and black caterpillars. We wondered what kind of butterfly those turn into. (Edit: They turn into the Isabella Tiger Moth.)

Wooly Bear caterpillar.

The loop was supposed to be 4.2 miles, but somehow all our various devices said we walked between 8.5 and 10 miles. With the extra mile and a half each way back to the car from the loop start we would have added 3 miles, but we wouldn’t have made it to 8 or 10 so I’m not sure how that happened. My feet sure felt like it was more than 4.2 though! We had a good walk and I know a lot more than I did about how to plan for the ladies’ hike in October.

A warm and hazy day.
Antiquing, Cool Stuff, Family, History

Mirror, Mirror

Here is the mirror I got at the barn sale a couple of weeks ago. The Hubs was able to attach a hanger to the back and hang it on the wall in my office with a wall anchor. Looks good, right? I like mirrors, the house is full of them!

The new mirror goes well with my frame wall.

Frame wall with ancestors.

I am blessed with a beautiful office!

Backpacking, Fun, hiking, History, PCT, People

Hike — Milo McIver State Park

Today we took our last training hike before leaving for the PCT to Milo McIver State Park in Estacada (Oregon) at Marnie’s suggestion. The park is named after Milo K. McIver, who was a member and then chairman of the Oregon Highway Commission in the 1950s and 1960s. He was instrumental in investing nearly $1 billion on about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) of new highway. During his term as chairman, Oregon led all other states in opening interstate freeways. The park contains a colony of Townsend’s big-eared bats, a sensitive species in Oregon, and the largest yew tree in Oregon (second largest in the nation!) is located in the park. There are a couple of nice campgrounds, some group camp areas, some day use pavilions, and equestrian trails. This was the first time any of us had been to the park.

We had a nice hike on the Riverbend and Maple Ridge trails, starting in the Riverbend side of the park. There are a few nice restrooms with flushing toilets in the park, which is always a bonus when hiking!

Marnie and Linda on the trail.

Linda and me, going down some steps.

The Clackamas River is close at hand throughout most of the park, and it is very scenic. They have added some channels and engineered log jams to make better fish habitat.

Clackamas River
Clackamas River — we saw a couple of people fishing and some kayakers

We walked by some of the 27 disc golf holes and saw many berry bushes and flowers, and quite a lot of daisies and Oregon Grape.

Bleeding Heart

Blackberry blossoms – lots of berries to come!

Not sure what kind of berries these are, they seem to grow quite low to the ground. Both Marnie and Linda ate one and neither of them died, so…

Daisies

Oregon Grape

There was a short trail to a landslide viewpoint. I’m sure it would have been more interesting if it hadn’t been so overgrown.

Landslide viewpoint – photo by Marnie

We noticed quite a number of snails on the trail, some brown and speckled and some white with stripes, with shells about an inch in diameter, but no snail photos were taken. We saw an owl that was annoying a number of birds, the birds were flying all over screeching and hollering. As we walked into the area the owl flew down toward my head and then into a nearby tree, where Marnie got this photo of it.

The Owl

After our hike we decided to check out the Clackamas Fish Hatchery that is in the park. Most of the pools were empty, but there were some tiny baby salmon in a couple of big pools (with some birds standing by for a meal!), and some very large salmon in a smaller pool. In the baby pool some of the fish were jumping around the water coming out of the pipes.

Pool with baby salmon

Baby salmon

Pool with adult salmon

Linda checks out what looks like a fish ladder, it flows out into the river.

The next feature of the park we went to see is the second largest yew tree in the nation. It is a Pacific yew. There was no sign to indicate which tree it was, but Linda was able to confirm what a yew tree looks like on her iPad. I had seen a much smaller one before and the only thing I could remember about it was its unique bark. We thought this tree looked like it needed some care. Since it is a feature of the park and is even on the little map, we hope that someone will come take care of it soon.

Yew tree

The last interesting area of the park we visited was the Milo McIver memorial viewpoint. A cobbled walk leads to the McIver memorial, and further on to the viewpoint deck where you can see Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams, and Mt. St. Helens, although today clouds obscured all but a glimpse of Mt. Hood and a snippet of Mt. Adams.

Milo McIver memorial plaque

The memorial plaque has an interesting 3D sculpture of Mr. McIver. The photo above was taken from straight in front of the plaque, and the photo below was taken from the side.

Memorial plaque from the side

View from McIver Memorial Viewpoint – photo by Marnie

A zoomed-in glimpse of Mt. Hood

A guide to the view – photo by Marnie

After our visit to the memorial viewpoint we hopped back in the car and headed home through Silverton so we could stop at Dairy Queen, our favorite après-hike food place. We had a nice late lunch and were home by 3:00.

Everything is coming together for our PCT hike starting soon!

Just keep walking!

~Ninja

Cool Stuff, DIY, History, Home, Home and Garden, Home Care

Light Switch Time Capsule

When we were remodeling our bathroom and took down the sheetrock, we found two different families’ names inside the wall, written on the back of the sheetrock of the opposite room. One was from the 1950s, and one from the 1970s where it looked like the kids had written the names and ages of the parents and kids. The oldest boy (16) had written his name away from the others, ha. We really enjoyed seeing the names and added our own with the message (referring to the bathroom remodel) “We did the best we could!”

So here’s an even better idea — someone has set up a light switch cover template with a tiny font you can use to write a message for the future occupants of your house to find after you leave! You can find it here in this article from Makezine.com. Wouldn’t it be even more fun to leave a note behind EVERY light switch cover? 😁😁

Photo from “Light Switch Time Capsule” on Makezine
1940s, Change, Cool Stuff, History, Hmm..., Travel

1940s Saturday 2-1-14

This last weekend I bought a few magazines from the 1940s.  I’m kicking myself for not buying the whole pile, but hoping that the man will be at the flea market next month with the rest.  I want the magazines because A)  I love reading old magazines; B) Our house was built in 1946 and I’m interested in the history; and most importantly C) we have been re-doing our bathroom, and I’ve decided (I think) to decorate with travel ads from the 1940s.  This is the cover of one of the magazines, which will be perfect for my travel theme.  Seriously, you should have seen the giant grin on my face when I found it! 

 

 

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While looking through old magazines, I’m always struck by how similar the articles and content are to what we have today.  For instance, I read an article about a lady who was a writer, and tired of trying to do her work in a space where she was constantly trampled by children, puppies, and tradespeople, decided to redo a cellar room into a study. She managed to do it for only $25, ($384.59 by today’s standards, according to The Inflation Calculator).  Today, however,  I saw this in a 1941 Better Homes and Gardens.  The first two paragraphs read:

“There’s one sure way to tell a long-lasting paint. Find out how much white lead it contains. For as good painters and architects will tell you, the greater the white lead content, the more enduring the paint. And you can’t get a more weather-resistant paint than one containing 100% pure white lead.”

 

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<Jaw drops to floor>

Little did they know, a few years later children would be seriously injured from eating bits of the paint that was not, I suppose, as durable as the ads wanted them to believe.  Of course, 15 years ago people still thought margarine was better for you than butter.  We just never know when our prevailing wisdom will turn to foolishness!  Open-mouthed smile

Cool Stuff, Fun, History, Memories, Success!

They Found the Kite Man!!

Two and a half years ago I wrote a post about a local Pacific Power public service television commercial I remember seeing as a child (read the post “Kite Man” here for reference). Today, I am incredibly pleased to announce that the video, after being lost for years, is finally on the internet!  Thanks, Jason Rouse, and thanks to Rob for letting us know where to find it!  Here it is:

The Kite Man

Over the last couple of years I’ve realized that I’m not the only one who wanted to see this again and show it to the next generation.  It is one of the most read posts on my blog, and there are numerous Facebook pages about the subject, including this one: Search For the Kite Man

How many of you hear the word “frogs” and still automatically respond “I like frogs.”? Open-mouthed smile

Cool Stuff, Fun, History, Kids, Life, Observations, People, Trivia

Classic Culture Reference of the Day

In so many of the new kids’ cartoons there are classic culture references that the kids (and probably many adults my age) just don’t get, and when I see these I am compelled to ask my kids, “Do you know why that’s funny?” 

Today my son and I are were watching “Courage the Cowardly Dog”.  There was a scene where Courage and a Bigfoot got in a food fight, and at the end of the food fight they both had piles of fruit on their heads and skirts made of bananas and were dancing the samba.  I said something like “Ha ha, Carmen Miranda!”  and Ben said something like “Huh?!” so I made him watch this video because I feel it is my responsibility to teach him everything I can possibly think of.

 

Ben and I were at the bank drive-up ATM today and I was telling him “Now, when you’re at the ATM be sure to keep your car doors locked, and look around to make sure nobody is sneaking up to take your money, etc. etc.” and he said “Yes, I know, that’s the third time you told me!”  I think I’ll make him watch this video a couple more times just so he doesn’t forget who Carmen Miranda is.

 

Watch the video, then try not to sing and dance.  It’s impossible, the samba is irresistible!   La la la la la chica chica boom chic!! Boom ch’boom boom boom ch’boom…

Cool Stuff, Fashion, History, Life, Memories

Monday Memories

I thought I’d start a “Monday Memories” series to put down some sort of random memories that pop up in my brain here and there.  I’d love to hear some of yours, too!

I heard the name “Heidi” yesterday and it reminded me of a girl who took care of my sister and me during the summer one year when our mom had gone back to work to sell real estate.  (This was around 1980 or 1981, when the real estate market had unfortunately bottomed out.)

Heidi was 17 years old and she was a wonderful babysitter.   She was very pretty and had an old pickup to drive us places, which we thought was extremely cool.

The clearest memory I have of Heidi is that she had a purse that looked like a rolled up magazine.  It was a plastic clutch style to hold under your arm, and you couldn’t tell it was a purse.  I had never seen one before and she had gotten it on a trip somewhere, so I couldn’t get one.  But, I just found some beautiful models and more info about them online at StyleWithAnna!   This site just gave one away, but I missed it. :’-(   You can buy them at Clutch For Cures, and I also found a vintage model on eBay.  I’ll have to start saving immediately to get one!